Repeated stress causes reversible impairments
of spatial memory performance

by
Luine V, Villegas M, Martinez C, McEwen BS.
Department of Psychology,
Hunter College, New York, NY 10021.
Brain Res. 1994 Mar 7;639(1):167-70.


ABSTRACT

Restraint stress, 6 h/day for 21 days, caused an impairment, during acquisition, of the performance of a spatial memory task, the eight-arm radial maze. The impairment was reversible, temporally limited and blocked by phenytoin, a blocker of excitatory amino acid action, or tianeptine, an antidepressant, which lowers extracellular serotonin. These effects on behavior parallel the reversible stress-induced atrophy of dendrites of hippocampal CA3 neurons that are also blocked by the drugs.
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